Doing your research in a MOOC

September 23, 2013 § 4 Comments

Imagine research with no internet...

Imagine research without internet…

You recently started the UvA MOOC ‘Introduction to Communication Science’ (or any other MOOC) and you’re already feeling overwhelmed. So much to learn in a short period of time… Of course, the content available in the MOOC itself it’s enough for you to complete quizzes and the final exam. However, what if you want to explore the topic further? Should you read all texts recommended? Perhaps you’re a professional already and has one specific interest about what other researches are saying about contemporary rhetorical theory… Where should you look? Indeed, there are many sources – from your favorite library to the web. But because MOOCs are mainly online, today I’m going to focus on great open digital resources you can use to enrich your experience in the course.

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MOOCs go mainstream

September 13, 2013 § Leave a comment

MOOC entry on Oxford dictionary.

MOOC entry on Oxford dictionary.

Now it’s official. MOOCs are becoming so popular that even Oxford has included the acronym on its dictionaries. Defined as “a course of study made available over the Internet without charge to a very large number of people”, MOOCs can be more than that, as I mentioned here in many posts. Their flexibility allows students to explore the content any time they want and the possibility to study within a network enable new forms of pedagogy, learning experiences and connections. « Read the rest of this entry »

UvA MOOC – 2nd edition

May 24, 2013 § Leave a comment

If you still want to enroll in a MOOC about Communication Science, here is a great opportunity: the UvA MOOC will continue on September 12, 2013!

Credit: UvA MOOC

Credit: UvA MOOC

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All-powerful audience

March 13, 2013 § Leave a comment

wordle moocLast week’s UvA MOOC lecture was  about the linear effect-oriented approach of communication, mainly developed by the media in the 20th century. Between the First World War and the popularization of television, many theories were developed to somehow explain how the “all-powerful media” constructs different realities and influences its audience. It was very interesting, for example, to see the classic example of radio broadcast “War of the Worlds” being deconstructed by theorists Paul Lazarsfeld and Herta Herzog. What used to be an example of the “bullet theory” effect (immediate, precise and short term), had to be reviewed: what was behind the panic? Media’s own exaggeration and a mix of decontextualized understandings? Those might be still current characteristics of the present media, but it’s easy to see that online, audience power has increased and became appreciated.

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